Public Historians at Work

Documenting People through Food, Stories, and Art: Amy C. Evans

March 31, 2021 Center for Public History @ University of Houston Season 1 Episode 3
Public Historians at Work
Documenting People through Food, Stories, and Art: Amy C. Evans
Chapters
Public Historians at Work
Documenting People through Food, Stories, and Art: Amy C. Evans
Mar 31, 2021 Season 1 Episode 3
Center for Public History @ University of Houston

In this episode of Public Historians at Work, Dr. Monica Perales sits down with Amy C. Evans, a Houston-based artist and oral historian, to talk about her work documenting people’s diverse stories over good food and art. In their conversation recorded on December 4, 2020, Amy describes the organic process through which she came to identify as a public historian, first working as an oral historian with the Southern Foodways Alliance and more recently as an independent documentarian and artist in the city of Houston. 

Through their conversation, we learn how public historians can explore complex and often difficult histories through food and recover lost spaces and stories through a variety of creative media. Finally, Amy explains her most recent project, Houston in 2020, which documents the impact of current political, economic, and cultural factors on five black artists in Houston.

For more on Amy C. Evans, see:

"Art and Pie" - https://www.amycevans.com/

"Houston in 2020: Self-Employed Black Artists" - https://www.houstonin2020.com/

Twitter @artandpie

Show Notes

In this episode of Public Historians at Work, Dr. Monica Perales sits down with Amy C. Evans, a Houston-based artist and oral historian, to talk about her work documenting people’s diverse stories over good food and art. In their conversation recorded on December 4, 2020, Amy describes the organic process through which she came to identify as a public historian, first working as an oral historian with the Southern Foodways Alliance and more recently as an independent documentarian and artist in the city of Houston. 

Through their conversation, we learn how public historians can explore complex and often difficult histories through food and recover lost spaces and stories through a variety of creative media. Finally, Amy explains her most recent project, Houston in 2020, which documents the impact of current political, economic, and cultural factors on five black artists in Houston.

For more on Amy C. Evans, see:

"Art and Pie" - https://www.amycevans.com/

"Houston in 2020: Self-Employed Black Artists" - https://www.houstonin2020.com/

Twitter @artandpie